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Hartlepool's importance dates back to the industrial revolution when she became an important port for exporting coal mined in the county of Durham.Hartlepool also became an important shipbuilding centre.Wingfield Castle, as well as being a fine exhibit to scramble around with some audio presentations to explain the operation of the engines and the history of the ship, operates as the museum's cafeteria.The latest refurbishment has introduced changes which detract from her historical authenticity to comply with modern accessibility standards.However, by the time of his own generation (1834-1904) three lines had emerged and are represented by that of Powerscourt (Ireland), those of Tickencote (Rutland) and Onslow (Shropshire) in England.

This "Robert of the field of the wind" was apparently alive in 1087 and may have been the Saxon Thane who bid farewell to Harold at Harleston when that Saxon King was on his way to fight the Normans in the Battle of Hastings.Important note for site admins: If you are the administrator of this website note that your access has been limited because you broke one of the Wordfence blocking rules.The reason your access was limited is: "Access from your area has been temporarily limited for security reasons".Once is that, "When King Harold visited that part of Suffolk he stayed with the Nobel Thane of Wingfield and on his departure mounted his horse from a certain stone to which the local people pointed subsequently and called it Harold's stone." That place later became the village of Harleston that lies about four miles from the village called Wingfield.The second story comes from a manuscript in the British museum which states, "Wingfield was sometime the estate of Richard de Brews, but more anciently belonged to a family who took their name from it and who were in great reputation there for many ages."It was, of course, not until after the Norman Conquest that history became more accurately recorded, so one must rely on imagination to picture the arrival of my Saxon ancestors paddling their long-boats up the River Waveney, perhaps sometime between the sixth and eighth centuries to establish their mud and waddle strongholds on the flat and fertile land of East Anglia.

This "Robert of the field of the wind" was apparently alive in 1087 and may have been the Saxon Thane who bid farewell to Harold at Harleston when that Saxon King was on his way to fight the Normans in the Battle of Hastings.Important note for site admins: If you are the administrator of this website note that your access has been limited because you broke one of the Wordfence blocking rules.The reason your access was limited is: "Access from your area has been temporarily limited for security reasons".Once is that, "When King Harold visited that part of Suffolk he stayed with the Nobel Thane of Wingfield and on his departure mounted his horse from a certain stone to which the local people pointed subsequently and called it Harold's stone." That place later became the village of Harleston that lies about four miles from the village called Wingfield.The second story comes from a manuscript in the British museum which states, "Wingfield was sometime the estate of Richard de Brews, but more anciently belonged to a family who took their name from it and who were in great reputation there for many ages."It was, of course, not until after the Norman Conquest that history became more accurately recorded, so one must rely on imagination to picture the arrival of my Saxon ancestors paddling their long-boats up the River Waveney, perhaps sometime between the sixth and eighth centuries to establish their mud and waddle strongholds on the flat and fertile land of East Anglia. Gray at Hartlepool, England Engines : Triple Expansion Diagonal, 18, 28.5 and 46 in x 51 in Dimensions : 199.9 ft (overall) x 33.1/57 ft 556 Gross Registered Tonnes Built for LNER Railway (later British Railways) Hull - New Holland ferry service On of three paddlers maintaining a year-round service for passengers, cars, cattle and cargo Withdrawn in 1974 as the new Humber Suspension Bridge took away most of the traffic Sold various times and lying derelict in Swansea when purchased by Hartlepool Borough Council Returned to Hartlepool in June 1986 for restoration Moored at the site of the former William Gray & Co shipyard as an exhibit of Hartlepool Museum Refurbished in 2006/2007 with the help of the Lottery Heritage Lottery Fund, the European Regional Development Fund and the HMS Trincomalee Trust The rotten traditional promenade deck planking has been replaced by a latex compound laid above a reinforced steel deck Saloon areas now converted for use for eductional seminars, corporate events etc There is no dedicated museum to paddle steamers in the UK and only Wingfield castle remains as purely a museum exhibit.