Intimidating people validating a form with javascript

31-Jul-2016 23:04

I think everyone feels a little uneasy and off-balance when they're around those handful of people who just seem to have everything going for them.

They may be really outgoing as well, which can add in all the problems from the point above.

However, there are times when it's absolutely necessary to scare people off a little bit and to assert yourself.

If you need to be mean and intimidating toward someone, then you have to have an attitude of "I don't care what anyone thinks," a healthy dose of confidence, and the words to back it up.

If we were bringing in the same amount of sales or better, we could ask for a raise confident that the club owner needed us just as much as we needed him.

I also started to hang out after hours with the bartenders, and they'd tell me how much they made in tips and what percentage that amount was of their total bar take.I multiplied that amount by the number of registers, divided by the number of customers, and pretty soon I had a good idea of how much the club was making per head on the nights we played.Then, I would come on nights that other bands were playing--bands that I knew were being paid more than we were--and I'd do the same calculations.I'd tell them jokes, and at the end of the night (assuming everybody was in a good mood), I'd ask how many people came to see our show. I was able to size up a room pretty well, and the numbers they gave me were often low.They never wanted the bands to know how well they were doing.

I also started to hang out after hours with the bartenders, and they'd tell me how much they made in tips and what percentage that amount was of their total bar take.

I multiplied that amount by the number of registers, divided by the number of customers, and pretty soon I had a good idea of how much the club was making per head on the nights we played.

Then, I would come on nights that other bands were playing--bands that I knew were being paid more than we were--and I'd do the same calculations.

I'd tell them jokes, and at the end of the night (assuming everybody was in a good mood), I'd ask how many people came to see our show. I was able to size up a room pretty well, and the numbers they gave me were often low.

They never wanted the bands to know how well they were doing.

On nights when the gas crisis or bad weather wreaked havoc on the local bar scene, I recognized that just because we had a guaranteed fee, some nights were not financially successful. They created bad blood, and as soon as their crowds began to shrink, the club owners couldn't wait to cut their pay and be less cooperative in many other ways.