Trinidad and tobago dating site

10-Apr-2015 18:00

Trinidadians of European ancestry are called "White" or "French Creole." There are a number of designations for those of black–white ancestry, including "Mixed," "Colored," "Brown," and "Red" among other terms.

The term Creole, from the Spanish criollo , meaning "of local origin," refers to Blacks, Whites, and mixed individuals who are presumed to share significant elements of a common culture as well as biogenetic properties because most claim these designations do not represent "pure races." The term Creole thus tends to relegate non-Creoles like East Indians to a somewhat foreign status. The term "French Creole" refers to white families of long standing whether their surname is French-derived or not.

Plantation agriculture based on enslaved labor existed alongside a significant peasant sector.

The British colonies of Trinidad and Tobago were united administratively in 1889.

British administrators, British planters, and their slaves added to the island's ethnic, national, and linguistic diversity.

Enslaved Africans arrived from varied ethnic, cultural, linguistic, and religious groups from along the West African coast, while Creole slaves spoke a French or English creole, depending on their islands of origin.

There was little if any intermarriage and little intermating between the two groups. Colonial discourses on African and Indian ancestral culture depicted Blacks as culturally "naked" and Indians possessing a culture, albeit an inferior one to European culture.

These divisions dictated the course of national identity and nationalist politics. Perhaps for this reason, Blacks have emphasized Western learning and culture and Indians have emphasized the glories of their subcontinental past.

From 1845 to 1917, about 144,000 indentured Indians were brought to the island.

Trinidad is 1,864 square miles in area (4,828 square kilometers), and Tobago is 116 square miles (300 square kilometers).

At its closest point, Trinidad is some seven miles from the coast of Venezuela on the South American mainland. It has three mountain ranges, roughly parallel to each other, running east to west in the north, central, and south parts of the island. The central part of the island is more flat and is where sugar cane is grown.

The island was called Iere, meaning "the land of the hummingbird," by its native Amerindian inhabitants.

Tobago's name probably derived from tabaco (tobacco in Spanish).

From 1845 to 1917, about 144,000 indentured Indians were brought to the island.

Trinidad is 1,864 square miles in area (4,828 square kilometers), and Tobago is 116 square miles (300 square kilometers).

At its closest point, Trinidad is some seven miles from the coast of Venezuela on the South American mainland. It has three mountain ranges, roughly parallel to each other, running east to west in the north, central, and south parts of the island. The central part of the island is more flat and is where sugar cane is grown.

The island was called Iere, meaning "the land of the hummingbird," by its native Amerindian inhabitants.

Tobago's name probably derived from tabaco (tobacco in Spanish).

Under British colonialism there was a clear ethnic division of labor, with Whites as plantation owners, Chinese and Portuguese in trading occupations, Blacks and Coloreds moving into the professions and skilled manual occupations, and East Indians almost completely in agricultural pursuits.